Understanding, But Not Sharing, Despair

I want to get this blog post just right, and yet I’m afraid that I will fail miserably.

But I’m going to try.

I read today about the Short family, a family from Pennsylvania who died of an apparent murder-suicide.  They had a chronically ill kid, a child who had received a heart transplant.  They had been featured in their local newspaper when their daughter Willow received the heart. The story was hopeful, it was upbeat.  There was a future thanks to a generous donor.  People like to think of it as a happy ending, but in reality organ donation is only a beginning.

A year later, the same family was featured in a New York Times article, detailing how hard it is to get the anti-rejection drugs compounded and filled, where it shows a picture of the mom dosing up the medicines, which by the way are the exact same medicines my daughter takes.  We have shared the same terror of worrying that you are going to run out of the medication that is keeping your daughter alive because of some stupid rule made by either the pharmacy or your insurance company.

In fact, up to this point, I know exactly how they feel.  Scared, hopeful, struggling.  There’s not a lot of place in this world for a sick kid.  I’ve said that for so many years now I feel like a broken record.  Not a lot of place, so parents of these kids keep fighting.  Fighting for prescriptions, fighting for 504s or IEPs in school.  Fighting for doctors’ appointments, fighting to be heard by doctors and nurses, by other hospital staff, by pharmacies and insurance companies.  Giving the thumbnail version of your child’s illness to every new person on the phone, every health care worker you meet, every time.

It’s exhausting.

And yet, none of us know what we sign up for as parents, and we have to move forward.  We are not just caregivers, but nurses, social workers, dieticians, pharmacists, and medical managers.  No one is going to do it for us, and no user manuals are included.

There are other kids in the family, kids who might not get as much attention as they deserve because the parents have to deal with the sick kid, the emergency, the crisis.  They are unwitting victims of the tragedy.  That adds pressure, too, the fact that you know you’re not able to be the kind of parent you want to be to all of your kids because there simply aren’t enough hours in the day.

There are stresses with work, normal stresses, but nothing more stressful than the idea of losing your job, because you need those health insurance benefits more than anything else.  So you make fewer waves even if something might be wrong because you can’t afford to be unemployed.  There are sacrifices you make, as little as sleep or as large as a professional life, in service to the illness and the medical needs of the chronically ill child.

All of these problems contribute to difficulty in a marriage.  You promise to love, honor and cherish when things are at their brightest and the future has all sunshine and rainbows, but stress, bills, worry, and problems are unrelenting.  You are constantly afraid that the delicate balance you’ve constructed will get tipped again with an emergency. You are waiting for the other shoe to drop.

Damn, it’s really hard.

The mom in this tragedy blogged about her struggles with PTSD, from dealing with her daughter’s medical issues.  She talked about her survivor’s guilt, knowing that another child died while her child lived.  I can personally attest to that guilt, and have blogged about it before in my piece, Dear Mom of My Daughter’s Kidney Donor.  It is a unique and exquisite combination of gratitude and guilt that parents of kids who have received organs from deceased donors share.

Now there are five dead bodies, six if you include the dog, in a murder-suicide. A family that seemed very public about their struggles, struggles that I share as the parent of a chronically ill kid.  And I feel so many emotions connected to it.  Anger at the futility of it, and anger for the donor family too.  Sadness, a bottomless sadness for the family.  Horrible unrelenting understanding at the dark side of the situation.   Gratitude for the love and support from my family and friends, because through all of the many years now I have never, ever felt alone.

Because the truth is, that while there’s not a lot place in this world for sick kids, there’s not much place in this world for their parents either.  It’s only through the personal connections you have and make that carry you through the hard times.  It’s knowing you’re never alone, that there’s always someone there to listen, laugh with, or help you problem solve.  It’s combating the feeling of isolation with the knowledge that there’s always someone there for you, and you are there in return for them.

Hug the ones you love today and thank them.

My deepest sympathies and condolences to those who knew and loved the Short family.

The National Suicide Prevention 24 Hour Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

 

Diabetic Misadventures In Italy

I love coming back from vacation and telling my friends and family about it.  Ok, I don’t really love coming back from vacation, but I do love sleeping in my own bed, petting my kitty cats and seeing friends that I’ve missed.  This year was a very special trip to Italy and its large southern island of Sicily.  While there, we visited with family and friends, we returned to the site of our marriage fifteen years ago, and we saw amazing places along the way.

Upon our return to the States, I tell our friends and family about swimming in the Tyrrhenian Sea, about eating at the same restaurant we did on our wedding night.  I talk about the flavors of Gelato, beautiful candy and earth colors of them lined up along the freezer, and of choosing new flavors like jasmine or pistachio-chocolate or green fig.  I tell them about the massive Greek temple ruins that the girls clambered along, about the graceful Baroque churches, or about the bell-towers or domes we climbed to get the best view.  I might tell them about the harrowing drives along the Amalfi Coast, with narrow roads hugging the cliffs or navigating traffic in Sicily where the street signs and traffic lights are more like suggestions than laws to native Italian drivers.  Maybe I share stories of encounters with the locals, like the sausage man who threw rings of salami in the air to the kids and persuaded us to buy a link as long as my seven-year-old’s arm.  These are the stories I tell them.  These are the stories that they want to hear.amalfi coast

But vacations are not all wonderful moments, and when you have a child with special health care needs, you not only have to plan more, but you have to be ready to roll with the punches when they come along, and that’s all a part of the journey, but not a part anyone wants to hear about.

My twelve year old has multiple health problems, but one of them is that she is a type one diabetic, which means that she cannot produce her own insulin to digest carbohydrates.  We have to give her insulin with every meal based upon what she eats so that she will stay healthy.  This has to be given subcutaneously, or under the skin, in order for it to work.

The first moment of terror for me this vacation was when I realized, suddenly, that we had foolishly forgotten the extra insulin for my daughter at home.  We had enough for a week, but we would be away a few days longer than that.  Calls were made to our insurance company, and we discussed overnight shipping, ice packs, and reliable addresses.  This didn’t sound like a good option.  So I learned how to say in Italian, “My daughter is a diabetic, and I would like to buy some more insulin,” Normally, my Italian is limited to restaurant menus and directions to the WC, so this was a stretch. We were in a tiny hill town called Castel Gandolfo, some twenty miles south of Rome, it holds the summer palace of the pope and contains the dairy cows used to make his special milk.  It sits on the edge of an old volcanic crater that now has a lake.  Our apartment looked out over the lake and we could walk the whole circumference of the hill town in under a half hour.  We went to the first farmacia, the Italian word for pharmacy, with a green fluorescent cross outside its door, located in the shadow of the summer palace. The pharmacist understood what I was trying to say, but told me in Italian that he didn’t have what I needed, but not to worry, other farmacias would, I just needed to keep looking.  Ok, onto the next stop.castello gandolfo

This was the town of Amalfi, when fifteen years earlier my husband and I got married in the presence of a handful of close friends and family.  We had planned to have dinner at the same restaurant as we did on our wedding night, so we arrived early to the town, walked around and waited for the restaurant to open.  I spotted a farmacia tucked away in a little square.  Amalfi is a seaside community, with steep cliffs and rocky beaches, and I was standing in line at the farmacia with beach goers who had gotten too much sun or mothers that needed more formula for their babies.  But luck was with me, the woman at the farmacia produced what I needed:  a vial of Humulog.  I finally was able to relax knowing that we could take care of our daughter for the whole vacation, and get insulin as we needed it.

noto dome

Which was good, because we needed it again, in a more dire way.  My daughter wears an insulin pump, and we were in the small Baroque town of Noto in south east Sicily.  We were admiring the large cathedral in town that was showing off its new dome, because the old dome had collapsed in the 1990s and it had just been reconstructed.  The church was beautiful, clean, cream colored, with gorgeous statues along the walls and spacious pews making the whole church feel light and airy.  When we heard the high pitched alarm, we knew immediately what it was, Wendy’s insulin pump had malfunctioned, and needed to be replaced.  I sat in a corner of the church looking at a statue, getting out the medical supplies, and making a new “pod” of insulin so we could put it back on Wendy.  That involves disconnecting the old pump, filling a new one with a large syringe and a vial of insulin, making sure it works, then re-attaching it, and turning it back on.  I wondered if anyone was going to stop me with the large medical bag and beeping equipment, but no one did.    I filled the new pod with the last of the insulin, and then I handed it to Wendy to apply it in a bathroom with an alcohol pad.  Normally I would help her, but Italian bathrooms are notoriously tiny, so she did it herself.

We walked around the lovely town thinking we had dodged a bullet, climbing the bell tower and looking at the magnificent view, but when we found a local trattoria and ordered our dinner, we noticed that Wendy’s blood glucose was too high and gave her a bolus of insulin before dinner.  It didn’t work and she went higher, so we gave her another bolus, but that didn’t work either.  Something was wrong.

It turns out that Wendy didn’t apply the new pod well to her skin and it wasn’t working.  I had used the last of the insulin on the new pod, and we had more in the refrigerator back where we were staying, an hour away.  We were with another couple, a childhood friend of my husband and his family, and we had all visited the town together, had dinner together, and we had promised the four children gelato if they did well in the restaurant.

single gelato

The problem was that Wendy’s glucose was too high to go untreated and give her gelato too.  It would have sent her sugar up to dangerous levels.  But all of the other kids were expecting gelato, in fact, the town of Noto is supposed to have the best gelato in Sicily.  We couldn’t tell them just wait while we drive an hour to get more insulin, reapply a new pod, hope it works, and drive back another hour.  It was late, it was dark, and the kids expected the best gelato in Sicily.

An option could have been to let the other kids have gelato but not Wendy, but honestly, that would be a scarring memory for her, and while we want her to know that she is extraordinary, we want her to know that she is normal too, that she can do normal things, just like the other kids, and that includes sampling the best gelato in Sicily.  Imagine watching your friends all eating gelato and you can’t at the age of twelve.

Now tell me what you would do as a parent.

Farmacia Italy-746316

So we went to a farmacia in Noto.  I spoke my sentence in Italian.  The first one didn’t have a vial.  We walked to a second one, and thank God, they did.  We opened the box, opened the vial, pulled out an insulin syringe that I also happen to have with me in the medical bag, calculated what she would need to give her to both reduce her glucose and give her insulin for a gelato too, and we filled the syringe, gave her a shot in the arm right there in the farmacia, admist little boys with tummy aches and people who needed band-aids, handed the used syringe to the pharmacist to dispose of safely, and we left the store.

Then we walked to the restaurant with best gelato in the world and ate it.

And it was delicious.

After it was all over, after the alarm, the new pod in the church, the dinner, the two farmacias, the injection and finally the gelato, it had taken the better part of the afternoon and evening, just for one little girl, just for one diabetic, just for one vial of insulin, just for one cup of gelato.

And what was the best part of the day for me?  My twelve year old, when it was all over and we were walking back to the cars after the gelato, ready for the drive back to where we were staying, took me aside by the arm, kissed me on the cheek, and thanked me for going through all of that.  She understood the effort it took, and she was grateful. That’s what I’ll remember, not how hard it was, but how much she appreciated being able to be just one of the the other kids joking and laughing and eating the best gelato in Sicily.

This is not a story I’m necessarily going to share with my family and friends when I get home.  Why not?  It’s not exactly what they want to hear.  They want to hear about the swimming and the churches and the beautiful art, the stories of the crazy drivers and the marketplace hawkers.  They don’t want to hear about the hard stuff, the worry, the difficulties.  Vacations are supposed to be fun, right?

But to me, this isn’t just a vacation, it’s showing my daughter that her medical difficulties can be overcome, that problems can be sorted out, even in another country, even when we don’t speak the language.  That if she really wants something, we will find a way.  That she shouldn’t be held back by the difficulties, but should look at them as challenges to be worked through.  Yes, it’s a beautiful location to learn this lesson, and yes, we are lucky that she’s healthy enough to do the travelling in the first place.  But to me, the travelling is showing her that solutions are possible.

The rewards can be sweet.

Ripple Effect

Have you ever heard a story that just stays with you?  Something that hits at your core, that makes you think about it, and re-think about it, and connect to it, and share it.  Maybe you have stayed in the car a little longer in a driveway because you are listening to “Story Corps” on NPR.  Maybe it’s something you’ve read on facebook.  Sometimes, you don’t realize how much a person’s story means to you, in your own journey to understanding and recovery from a diagnosis or the diagnosis of your child.

This recently was brought to my attention when a woman asked to be my facebook friend.  I was pretty sure I didn’t know her, had never met her, but there were a lot of people I had met at the American Transplant Games, and many of the mutual friends she and I had in facebook were those same people I had only recently met in Cleveland.  So I decided to accept her friend request and see who she really was.

What I didn’t know is that I had been reading her blog posts for over seven years.

Her daughter, Lacey, had gone through two organ transplants, both a heart and a kidney.  The heart transplant happened when Lacey was a baby, and after many years of immuno suppression (which isn’t great on the kidneys) her kidneys gave out too.  Lacey’s brother donated his kidney to her.  I had read all about it on their CarePage.

CarePages are a medical blog where you can update your loved ones about your condition. There are other ones like it, the most popular being CaringBridge.   We had been blogging about Wendy’s illness from the first week that we were at Massachusetts General Hospital.  It was helpful because it kept everyone updated without having to tell the same story over and over again.  It also was therapeutic for me to take stock of the day in the evening and determine what had gone well and what hadn’t.  In a hospital where certain events happens quickly between long periods of waiting, it was helpful to think through every day to process it all and write about it for our loved ones.   It was also bolstering because our loved ones could write messages of support for us and for Wendy at the bottom of every post, carrying us through to the next day.  There was an option to keep it private, to have people ask to join the group, and initially that’s what we did, kept it closed for only family and friends.

At the point where we were told that Wendy was going to need a kidney transplant, we had never met anyone who had gone through organ transplantation before, so I searched in Carepages and found Lacey Wood’s site.  It’s called LuckyLacey, and it told not only all about her journey as a heart transplant patient, but also as a kidney transplant patient.  It told all about her competitions in the American Transplant Games and the World Transplant Games.  It talked about her college that has a special section for kids with transplants who are going through various stages of transplantation so that they can get the best care they need while still going to college.  I learned so much from this site, that there was a warm, caring transplant community that connected each other to the best care and resources, that there was a celebration of life and living.

At a time when I was very scared, this blog especially gave me hope.

It also showed me what was possible for Wendy.  We never would have known about the American Transplant Games, or the Transplant Winter Camp, or the Chronic Illness Initiative at DePaul University.  We learned though Lacey’s journey and through the generosity of her words in her Carepages blog.

Her blog made me re-think our blog, WildWonderfulWendy.  What if our blog about HUS and kidney transplantation helped someone else the way that LuckyLacey helped us?  Michael and I talked about it and decided to make Wendy’s blog public.  

And now, years later, I’ve started this blog.  I outlined why I decided to write it in the first place in my first post, Brave Fragile Warriors.  I realized that being the parent of a chronically ill kid can be incredibly isolating.  You have so many feelings and not a lot of people who can relate to you.

We never know what impact we have on another’s life.  We don’t know what our ripple effect is.

When Lacey’s  mother contacted me to be my friend on facebook and I realized who she was, I sat down and wrote to her to let her know how much Lacey’s blog helped me through the fear and isolation of being the mom of a kidney transplant kid.  Otherwise she never would have known her own ripple effect.

It’s so important to share these moments, so other parents know they are not alone.  It’s equally important to share with others how much their stories touch our hearts, so that they may continue to write.  We are many stories, but the Same feelings of helplessness, fear and love.

Thanks for reading my stories. Please share your own, in the comments below or with your own blog and then let me know so I can read them.

Forward together is better than forward alone.

“A Difficult Decision Was Made”

A room full of people, a room full of stories.  That’s what we encountered the other night.  It was the opening ceremony of the Transplant Games in Cleveland, Ohio.  Attended by over 6,000 people from 40 different teams around the country, there were recipients, living donors and donor families, a term given to those who lost loved ones and even in their time of acute grief, decided to donate their loved ones’ organs and tissue.  You can read the open letter I wrote to Wendy’s kidney donor’s mother here.

The emcee for the evening started the event by saying, “We are all here tonight because a difficult decision was made.”  It’s important to get it out there right away, because it was the elephant in the room.  Everyone was there because of a donor.  Now there are living donors, and that is no small feat, someone who willingly gives a piece of themselves, literally, to keep someone else alive.  They are not only honored at the games, but they are invited to compete as well.  More than that, however, are the donor families that need to be honored for their loss.  Lives were cut short, and lives were extended.  Just because it is a celebration of life, hell, the name of the event is the Donate Life American Transplant Games, doesn’t meant that there aren’t hundreds of people hurting because they have lost someone whom they loved. They wore their loved ones on pins, they posted their pictures on placards, they wore necklaces.  I spoke to a woman who told me all about her son who died when he was in his early twenties, and she said to me, “His friends are all getting married and having kids and I miss him every day. Every day it hurts.”  The emotions will always be raw for them, but it helps ( I hope) to have them see that their loved ones helped to extend the lives of so many more.  That’s what the games are all about.

This was the first time we went to the games and I had to really think about what we were going to say about donor families and what “giving life” really means.  Before the opening ceremonies we talked a little with the kids about Wendy’s donor and how he died and how his parents decided to donate his organs, and that it was likely that they were going to hear a lot of those stories tonight.  The stories would be emotional, but they are powerful and important to bear witness to them.  And, of course, we could talk about it after if they had any questions.

But this is hard stuff.  Life is messy.  This topic is something you don’t often talk about, and here we are sitting in a room full of people, an AUDITORIUM of people, talking about it.  When a story came up on the screen about a father who donated his son’s organs after he had an asthma attack, Penny leaned over and said, “This is one of the stories you warned us about, Mom,” as she held my hand.

Here is the thing that goes along with this knowledge, that people died and their organs were donated:  Palpable gratitude.  An auditorium full of grateful people:  recipients and those who love them.  Families and friends.  Whole teams of people who have gotten together to celebrate this extension of life.

And these people are competing and attempting sporting events they might not ever have done before, because they were given a second chance.  I have lots more stories, there will be more blog posts about these games because I’ve learned a lot in the past few days about  community through resilience, about the power of multiple generations coming together, about giving voice to the pain and the grief and the gratitude all at once.  About how your story is just a part of the thousands of other stories, creating a mosaic of meaning.

I’m going to say one more thing before I close.  Register to be an organ donor so that your loved ones don’t have to make the decision.  Over and over again, I heard how much easier it was for them to donate their loved ones’ organs because they knew it was what the person wanted.

Don’t make your loved ones make that decision.  Make it for them, so they can just follow your wishes.

More to follow.

Photo:  The Auditorium at the Donate Life Transplant Games, waiting for everyone to arrive.

Firefighters and Architects

“This will be a new litmus test for your friendships,” he said as we were walking down Cambridge Street. It was a warm summer day, and Mark was his usual affable self.  A friend from college, I remembered that he had the same email address as the doctors at the hospital,  so when I wrote to him, and said, “Hey, do you work at Massachusetts General Hospital?”  he came by the PICU that day and took me out to a bagel shop around the corner from the hospital.  A psychologist by training, he worked at MGH and managed to take us around a little at a time, orienting both Michael and me to the hospital and surrounding area.  He took us to the chapel, the central quad, and the Healing Garden:  a rooftop garden that overlooked the Charles River and had both inside and outside seating.  He brought us a loaf of banana bread that his wife made.  He cracked stupid, softball jokes.  He was just what we needed at the time.

He was right.  Our trauma, the medical trauma of our child, reordered our friendships, reshuffling them like a deck of cards.

There were some people whom we found drifted away.  For whatever reason, they couldn’t handle our trauma with us, whether it was because they had their own more pressing problems, or because they didn’t know what to say or do. Phone calls and emails got fewer and farther apart.    The loss smarted like a sunburn, but we all moved on.

Some people whom we had considered acquaintances, nice people but with whom we didn’t normally hang out, they were a nice surprise because they rose to the occasion, they met us at our lowest place and helped to lift us up.   They helped Wendy, by bringing toys and gifts.  They helped us with food and ideas and cards and hugs.  This was our nicest surprise, and those friendships have survived beyond the initial trauma.

Mostly, though, we found that our friend base, and even our families, fell into two groups:  Firefighters and Architects.

Firefighters rush in. They fix the immediate, broken parts.  They take care of the schedules, the child care, the food, the logistics.  They say, “I’m on it,” and they take care of whatever “it” is with efficiency and without you having to ask again. They are the ones who immediately call. They are there in the trenches with you, helping you to fight the immediate acute battle.  Their actions are their help.

They they retreat when the immediate assault is over.

In move the architects, who rarely are the first to call, but who sit back and wait to see what you will need later.  They are the ones who listen to your problems and offer long term solutions.  Often they are the ones who will tell you the hard truths,  help you make the big life changes,  help you to systematize and reorganize.  They help you to look at the wreckage and begin building again.  They stick around longer.  Their advice is their help.

Let me be clear, you need both of these kinds of people.

Rarely do you have a friend who is both a firefighter and an architect, each person has a  definite strength.  Sometimes a good friend will try really hard to be both, but to be honest, it’s exhausting when you are playing against your strength, and one set of characteristics usually rises up.  We found that often in a couple, one person is the firefighter and one is the architect, which makes sense because they balance each other out.  They are doing the best they can with what they’ve got.  So are you.

Friends and families will get you through the initial trauma, and the after effects.  It won’t be until later when you are looking back that you realize how much they helped.

 

 

Pattern of Acceptance

Once you get a diagnosis, how do you get to the point where you’ve accepted what’s happening to you, your child, your family, your life?

You may have heard of the Kubler-Ross model of grief.  At first it was applied to death and dying, but it has been spread out to many different kinds of grief.  You probably read about it in your psychology college textbook, because it’s not new.  I ran across it when Wendy was in the hospital and I realized that I was mourning our old life, the life before Wendy got sick, so I did some searching and rediscovered the Kubler-Ross model.  I am by no means a psychologist, but this helped me to get some perspective on our situation with a new diagnosis and a child that was never going to be the same again.  It’s a scary time, and your feelings and emotions run the whole gamut.  Sometimes I still check in to see where I am on the continuum.

But now, I like to think of it more as a pattern of acceptance than stages of grief.

Denial:  The first reaction is denial. In this stage individuals believe the diagnosis is somehow mistaken, and cling to a false, preferable reality.  I remember thinking not that the doctors were wrong in everything they were telling me in the “Room of Doom” in the PICU, but I remember thinking that they must be exaggerating.  They weren’t.  I hoped that once we got home Wendy would improve.  She didn’t.  I remember the night I realized that she wasn’t going to get better.  She just wasn’t.

Anger:   This is often accompanied by guilt.   “Why me? Why her?  What did we do to deserve this?”  I remember walking up and down the streets of Beacon Hill being jealous of families that were enjoying the summer.  There was a woman who was yelling at her child by the “Make Way for Ducklings” statues because he had gotten his hands dirty from his ice cream cone and it was all I could do to tell her to get over it, enjoy this moment, because your kid could be in the hospital right now.  Thankfully I kept my mouth shut.

Bargaining:  This is a hard one.  It involves the hope that we can somehow avoid this outcome.   I could understand why people go to the ends of the earth to find a miracle cure for their child.   People facing less serious trauma can bargain or seek compromise.  Sometimes it works.  My father said if Wendy survived that he would quit smoking.  You get the idea.  It’s trying to find what you can do to change the situation.

Depression:  This stage can last a long, long time, and some people argue that in part of this stage, Anger comes back.  Everything feels hopeless and you feel rudderless.  All of your expectations and plans have to either be put on hold or moderated. You wonder how it can all be so hard, and why it’s so unfair, especially for your child.  You might want to find a counselor to talk through your feelings.  It’s really hard for a long time, and then at some point you realize it’s not quite as hard, and you slowly move toward the next stage.

Acceptance:  “We’ve got this”.  This is the idea of doing the best you can with what you’ve got.  Gratitude sets in and you might find yourself being happy and being surprised at the happiness. You realize that life is moving on and you’re moving on with it.

I think, though, that for parents of chronically ill kids, that there can often be another stage:

Empowerment:  This is the stage where both you and your child take the hand you’ve been dealt and play it.  When you join advocacy groups, when you allow you child to re-join sports or after school activities or when you begin to travel again.  When you do the things you love even with the obstacle, even when it’s not exactly the same. You may be a mentor to other parents of chronically ill kids, or you may write or speak to groups.  Or you might not.  Just doing the best you can is enough, and it’s inspiring to others.

Other members of your family will find acceptance at different rates.  For us, one family member stayed longer in anger, one stayed longer in bargaining.  It’s totally an individual journey, and it’s important to realize that we don’t all come to the same understanding at the same time.  It takes a really long time to be ok with your life not being what you expected, and a new normal grows and takes hold, along with real, genuine happiness and gratitude.

The other thing that I want to say is that in this continuum, you might be knocked backward into other stages or have to start all over again with a new diagnosis.  We’ve been dealing with some new symptoms for Wendy and I’ve lately been keenly aware that we might be starting this cycle all over again, but that’s OK, we’ve done it before and we will do it again.  But that won’t mean it’s not difficult, or heart breaking, or painful or nerve-wracking, it just is.

Finally….when Kubler-Ross was interviewed years later, she said that she regretted putting the stages of grief into concrete categories, because while these are common stages, they aren’t definitive.  Where is room for confusion?  For frustration?  For complications?  For disillusionment?  These things that you feel, they are normal to feel.  Being aware about them, being in touch with your feelings and being able to both experience them and express them, will hopefully help you to heal.  Be gentle with others who are on this path with you.

Empathy goes a long way in the healing process.

Picture:  A winding road in Tuscany, leading to Montalcino.